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new zealand phptitleore dressing

new zealand phptitleore dressing

Clothing and identity Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

New Zealand does not have a specific national dress. Customary Māori clothing is the only form of dress that is distinctive to New Zealand. Ku give significant manaand honour to official occasions, such as royal tours and state funerals. In Europe, national dress evolved from peasant or folk styles and was linked with nationalist movements. Many of these forms of dress, most notably the Scottish kilt, were brought to New Zealand by migrants. Subtle details mark out PākehāNew Zealanders travelling overseas. In the 19th century these included a piece of pounamu on a mans watch chain. The 21st century equivalent was a pounamu pendant.

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With European settlement Māori men and women especially those living near mission stations and town settlements began wearing European clothing. One way Māori obtained European clothing was as payment in land transactions. Māori men and women wore European clothing in a variety of ways and on their own terms. Many outfits blended Māori and European styles. Māori design has had an impact on European clothing in New Zealand. A widely used motif is the spiral koru, a form based on the unfurling fern frond that represents new life. Pacific clothing influences have also been apparent. Since the 1970s Pākehā New Zealanders have sometimes worn colourful Samoan ie lavalava to the beach. In the 20th century distinctive national and ethnic clothing was usually only worn for special occasions, such as weddings and funerals, and national and religious days. With the dramatic increase in ethnic diversity in New Zealand a greater variety of everyday cl...

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Colonists dressed differently depending on their class. An 1849 handbook for intending immigrants emphasised plain, hard wearing flannel, cotton, worsted and fustian garments for labouring men. Gentlemen, on the other hand, were advised to bring 72 dress shirts and 40 waistcoats. Women who dressed above or beneath their station according to old world values were treated with either tolerance or disapproval, depending on the observers attitude. The cleanliness or dirtiness of clothing was also commented upon. Tensions could occur in relations between servants and mistresses over matters of dress. Into the 20th century class differences continued to be apparent in clothing. People were categorised as vulgar or cultured on the basis of personal appearance. Well off people could have bespoke clothing made for them by dressmakers and tailors. People in more modest circumstances made their own clothes. Those living in poverty needed to find ways to make ends meet, particularly when u...

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